Designing for staff efficiency

Interior design strategies that help hospital staff to provide timely and high-quality care

The way a hospital is designed can improve staff efficiency in many ways, such as minimizing steps required, and reducing fatigue and stress. Certain design components, such as standardized rooms and floor plans, can result in greater efficiency.

Standardized room design provides a consistent manner in which to deliver care. The orientation of staff to the patient and to other elements in the room, such as the hand-washing sink and supplies, are the same from room to room. “This approach reduces time spent searching for supplies and equipment,” says Jocelyn Stroupe, CHID, EDAC, IIDA, ASID, principal and director of health interiors, CannonDesign, Chicago. “Staff are familiar with the room’s organization and can focus more time on caring for the patient.”

READ MORE ➙

Read More

5 Workplace Trends Breathing Down the Neck of the Commercial Real Estate Industry

Despite the growth of open floor plans and creative workspaces, the US office environment has been curiously resistant to change in recent decades. Many workers across the country still toil away in cubicle-oriented space, which was designed without regard to actual human beings.

The workspace of today is already moving beyond the need to create proximity between people, which traditionally was the entire function of an office because it facilitated work. With people more connected today than ever, offices of the future will need to be about much more than proximity.

The new purpose of a workspace is to attract and retain the best talent.

Broadly speaking, companies are revamping offices in five major ways:

READ MORE ➙

Read More

Amanda Schneider Predicts Future Changes in the Contract Furniture Industry

We had the opportunity to meet up with industry consultant Amanda Schneider to talk about the revolutionary changes she sees coming in the contract furniture market and the impact these changes will have on furniture dealers, manufacturer reps, and manufacturers, including Formaspace Office. You may know Amanda from her research-led strategy firm, Contract Consulting Group, which helped produce the CBRE Furniture Forums in Chicago and Washington D.C., as well as her recent high-profile articles in the Business of Furniture Magazine and HuffPost.

READ MORE ➙

Read More

Active Interiors to Encourage Wellness

Design needs to work hard all year long and that’s especially true with wellness-centered design strategies that play a crucial role in keeping people happy, healthy, and active.

Encourage Walking to Boost Productivity

A few simple changes to space layout can encourage people to walk more. Arrange communal amenities (coffee makers, water dispensers, and equipment like printers or copiers) in a central location instead of sprinkling them throughout an office. Not only do users have to walk farther to get what they need, they’re also drawn into a mini meeting space where colleagues can bump into each other and spark impromptu conversations, noted Joshua Zinder, principal of JZA+D, an integrated design firm.

READ MORE ➙

Read More

Four keys to designing autistic-friendly spaces

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurobehavioral condition, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that one in every 68 births have autism in the U.S. Individuals with this condition may experience hypersensitivity of the senses, difficulty understanding what others are thinking and feeling, and cognitive delays. 

We have the potential to improve design quality for everyone by understanding how individuals with autism view the world. While autism in part gave us modern architecture, making ASD inclusivity a priority in design is a necessary step that could encourage innovation and potentially propel us into a new era of architecture.

You might wonder how autism could have given us modern architecture, well the answer lies in the use of eye tracking. As stated in a study in Common Edge, they have found that individuals with autism respond to visual stimuli completely different from neuro typical individuals. A neuro typical person focuses on the eyes, mouth, and nose of a face. 

READ MORE ➙

Read More

The Human Touch: Four Ways the Workplace is Becoming More Human-Focused

Today, employees are seeking environments that are more mobile, flexible, and personalized. JLL’s Workplace Strategy Lead, Bernice Boucher outlines four major ways the workplace is changing for the better. 

Do you experience happiness at work? What, exactly, makes your workplace experience happy? A good manager and like-able, competent co-workers are important, of course. Yet, a new study shows that the physical workplace itself can make or break your happiness on the job.

Happiness, rather than technology, is the key ingredient in a unique workplace experience, say nearly 70 percent of employees in Workplace—Powered by Human Experience, a global study of more than 7,300 employees in 12 countries. Most people are happier and more productive when their office is designed around their needs, rather than around rigid lines of “cube farms” or private offices. And, CEOs are noticing.

READ MORE ➙

Read More

Hotels design functioning gardens to cater to new trends

As guests demand fresher food that has been sourced locally (not to mention organically), hotels across the country are creating gardens and small farms to grow herbs and vegetables, and to even keep bees for honey. Best of all, even urban hotels are putting their rooftops to use and growing some basics for the kitchens below.

Creating these gardens and farms and making them—literally—fruitful can be more challenging than simply planting some seeds, as chefs and food-and-beverage teams often learn through experience.

READ MORE ➙

Read More

The True Cost of Noise

Dead silence can be an intimidating working environment.

Some sound in any workplace is generally desirable: pleasing background sounds like the gentle, indecipherable babble of colleagues speaking, one’s own choice of music or perhaps the sounds of nature coming through an open window. However, much of the sound in typical workplaces is undesirable: ringing phones, electromechanical noise, other people’s music and so on. We call this undesirable sound “noise”.

READ MORE

Read More

Why You Can’t Concentrate at Work

The problem is visual noise; companies get creative dialing down distractions that pull eyes away from desks, an unforeseen consequence of open-plan workspaces.

After taking down walls to create open offices and foster lots of interaction and collaboration, some companies are finding they’ve done the job too well. All of this social engineering has created endless distractions that draw employees’ eyes away from their own screens.

Visual noise, the activity or movement around the edges of an employee’s field of vision, can erode concentration and disrupt analytical thinking or creativity, research shows. While employers have long tried to quiet disruptive sounds in open workspaces, some are now combating visual noise too. The answer could be as low-tech as strategically placed plants or more drab wall colors.

READ MORE ➙

Read More

How Can Commercial Office Design Impact Your Business?

Is it Time for a Commercial Fit Out or Refurb?

On average your employees spend more waking hours at the office than anywhere else, so it’s important that your workplace is both welcoming and stimulating.

Without the right fit out your colleagues are bound to feel a bit unproductive. But by identifying the problems and discovering the solution, you’re closer than ever to developing a dream commercial space.

Let’s take a look at some of the problems and solutions…

READ MORE ➙

Read More

How environment impacts creativity

It is well known that most people are mainly driven by either the left or the right hand side of their brain. When it comes to the creative industry, where we are expected to use both sides equally in order to be the most creative we can be, what factors in our working environment affect our grey matter?

When looking at this from the left brain perspective (where we analyse the more scientific factors of an environment) we can learn what elements make us work most efficiently and creatively in our industry.

We can now analyse the factors affecting the right side of the brain, in order to give us a balanced view of making the most of our creativity. 

READ MORE ➙

Read More

Ten Tips for Improving Posture and Ergonomics

Over time, poor posture may be caused by habits from everyday activities such as sitting in office chairs, staring at the computer, cradling a cell phone, carrying a purse over same shoulder, driving, prolonged standing, caring for small children, or even sleeping.

See Office Chair, Posture, and Driving Ergonomics

Poor posture can easily become second nature, causing and aggravating episodes of back and neck pain and damaging spinal structures. Fortunately, the main factors affecting posture and ergonomics are completely within one's ability to control and are not difficult to change.

See How Poor Posture Causes Neck Pain

READ MORE ➙

Read More

20 Things Educators Need To Know About Learning Spaces

The 21st century is challenging old notions of learning spaces.

The idea that students must be seated at desks working in rows is quickly becoming archaic. Technology and collaborative work environments are changing the design of learning spaces. Experts hope that the emerging paradigm will translate into improved learning spaces and influence future architectural design.

READ MORE ➙

Read More